Broadening Access to Broadway?

 

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Andreas Feininger, “Theatre Ticket Sale, Times Square,” 1979, Museum of the City of New York [90.40.27]
It’s true that all New Yorkers can take advantage of any TKTS booth by the very fact of their mobility, but this philosophy—the idea that patrons should travel to a centralized, civic arts space for their cultural uplift—has proven over the past decades to rely on faulty logic.

Read the article at City Limits.

 

urban renewal, retrenchment, & La Mama

The four-story, red-brick Aschenbroedel Verein building, now La Mama E.T.C., 74 East 4th Street, 1977. Photo Edmund V. Gillon / Museum of the City of New York.
The four-story, red-brick Aschenbroedel Verein building, now La Mama E.T.C., 74 East 4th Street, 1977. Photo Edmund V. Gillon / Museum of the City of New York.

I’m very glad to have an article included in the insightful special issue of Performance Research, “On Institutions.” My piece contextualizes Ellen Stewart’s Off Off Broadway theatre, La Mama E.T.C., within a climate of fiscal crisis, neighborhood politics and real-estate policies of 1960s and 70s New York City.

Access the full article here, and follow this link to see the contents of the issue.

Lateral IV: Annie Lanzillotto and Eviction Survival Published

My article in Lateral IV, the journal of the Cultural Studies Association, is part of a special issue on performance and cultural studies, edited by Eero Laine and Stefanie Jones. “Live from the Nebulizer: Annie Lanzillotto and Eviction Survival,” can be read here.

Lanzillotto and her grandmother Rosa Marsico Petruzzelli performing together in a’Schapett! (1996) at the Arthur Avenue Retail Market in the Bronx. Photo: Andrew Perret
Lanzillotto and her grandmother Rosa Marsico Petruzzelli performing together in a’Schapett! (1996) at the Arthur Avenue Retail Market in the Bronx. Photo: Andrew Perret

 

 

 

Cut out the Nonsense (in ‘Ich bin ein Junge’)

07721a_a5ab81633fac4dcd868568fd497762ff.jpg_srz_p_295_290_75_22_0.50_1.20_0Ich bin ein Junge published an excerpt from my writing in progress, Cut Out the Nonsense:

On April 30, 1971, a public debate on Women’s Liberation was held in New York City’s Town Hall. It was not an even match. On one side was Norman Mailer, who had just published The Prisoner of Sex; on the other, four leading feminists: NOW president Jacqueline Ceballos; Germaine Greer, author of The Female Eunuch; Village Voice columnist Jill Johnston; and literary critic Diana Trilling. In 1979, footage of the debate was released under the title Town Bloody Hall. This brilliant and sadly neglected documentary by D. A. Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus…shows Mailer at his most combative, struggling in vain to maintain his composure as the women mount a relentless offensive that includes incisive social commentary, sharp-edged wit, and a lesbian cuddle puddle. The following piece reflects on this occasion.

READ THE PIECE AT ICH BIN EIN JUNGE…

Julie Bovasso & the Dramatic Imperative

Upcoming: the Association for Theatre Research (ASTR) conference in Baltimore, where I will participate in the Debating Postdramatic Theatre working session with, “The Moon is Ours! Julie Bovasso & the Dramatic Imperative.” Short excerpt below the still of Bovasso in Robert Frank’s 1961 short film, The Sin of Jesus.

Julie Bovasso in Robert Frank's The Sin of Jesus, 1961.

“And it was not just Actor’s Equity rules and cramped basement theatres that the Bovasso aesthetic mocked; on the downtown performance scene, a restless and expansionist avant-garde outgrew its playgrounds to find a tower of Babble awaiting them. Her characters speak English, Swedish, Chinese, Italian, and gibberish; their mother tongues are unstable, their desires are hysterical, their conflicts self-reinforcing. ‘What do you mean, dream’s over?’ a desperate lawyer asks a psychiatrist, holding tightly to the fantasy of Jungian interpretation. Bovasso’s writing and direction stressed the uncanny contours of loss, experienced through the performers’ resistance to their roles, and the playwright’s insistence on a fraudulent dramatis personae.”