Book Launch + 70s NYC Theatre & All-Day Feminist Film Screening

Visit the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center’s website for the full program information.

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Oct. 31 Book Event + Screening + Discussion

Monday, October 31, 2016
The Segal Theatre at the CUNY Graduate Center, 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10016-4309
6:30pm Discussion + 11:00am Screenings

Photo by Shalmon Bernstein

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

In the mid-1970s, many artists and organizations defied socially destructive policies and fought for the arts as a public good during New York City’s near-bankruptcy and resulting austerity. Scholar and playwright Hillary Miller’s book, Drop Dead: Performance in Crisis, 1970s New York (Northwestern UP, 2016), combines theatre history with analyses of productions of the time to examine how the performing arts survived the crisis. Miller’s account includes Broadway (TKTS), BAM, La MaMa E.T.C., and The Public Theater, and highlights the important role of Martin E. Segal in shaping the City’s cultural policy for decades to come. A panel of playwrights, directors, and historians will join in conversation about the theatre artists and arts institutions of the 1970s, and the significance of its theatrical legacies in our contemporary city. Invited are Julia Foulkes; Jessica Hagedorn; Muriel Miguel, Spiderwoman Theater; Cindy Rosenthal; Richard Wesley; and others (TBD).

All-Day ScreeningShorts from the Feminist Seventies is a selection of 16mm documentaries made by women in the 1970s on topics ranging from marriage, sex, and reproductive health to labor, identity, and memory—all culled from the New York Public Library’s Reserve Film and Video Collection. Opening remarks by curator and film scholar Shilyh Warren, and invited guest Elena Rossi-Snook, Archivist, Reserve Film and Video Collection, The New York Public Library. Additional support from Third World Newsreel.

Visit the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center’s website for the full program information.

 

photo credit: Shalmon Bernstein

Broadening Access to Broadway?

 

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Andreas Feininger, “Theatre Ticket Sale, Times Square,” 1979, Museum of the City of New York [90.40.27]
It’s true that all New Yorkers can take advantage of any TKTS booth by the very fact of their mobility, but this philosophy—the idea that patrons should travel to a centralized, civic arts space for their cultural uplift—has proven over the past decades to rely on faulty logic.

Read the article at City Limits.

 

urban renewal, retrenchment, & La Mama

The four-story, red-brick Aschenbroedel Verein building, now La Mama E.T.C., 74 East 4th Street, 1977. Photo Edmund V. Gillon / Museum of the City of New York.
The four-story, red-brick Aschenbroedel Verein building, now La Mama E.T.C., 74 East 4th Street, 1977. Photo Edmund V. Gillon / Museum of the City of New York.

I’m very glad to have an article included in the insightful special issue of Performance Research, “On Institutions.” My piece contextualizes Ellen Stewart’s Off Off Broadway theatre, La Mama E.T.C., within a climate of fiscal crisis, neighborhood politics and real-estate policies of 1960s and 70s New York City.

Access the full article here, and follow this link to see the contents of the issue.

Lateral IV: Annie Lanzillotto and Eviction Survival Published

My article in Lateral IV, the journal of the Cultural Studies Association, is part of a special issue on performance and cultural studies, edited by Eero Laine and Stefanie Jones. “Live from the Nebulizer: Annie Lanzillotto and Eviction Survival,” can be read here.

Lanzillotto and her grandmother Rosa Marsico Petruzzelli performing together in a’Schapett! (1996) at the Arthur Avenue Retail Market in the Bronx. Photo: Andrew Perret
Lanzillotto and her grandmother Rosa Marsico Petruzzelli performing together in a’Schapett! (1996) at the Arthur Avenue Retail Market in the Bronx. Photo: Andrew Perret